Buying Organic: Busting Myths

Posted on Jun 5 2019 - 9:00am by Samantha Clark
Share with your friends or save for later...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Email this to someone
email
Share on Reddit
Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin

When it comes to buying organic, is it really healthier for you? Isn’t it super expensive?  We find out from Soil Association Certification just what buying organic actually means.

It’s no healthier for you

Organic is nutritionally different – Scientific research found organic milk and meat contains around 50% more omega-3 fatty acids than non-organic, and organic fruit and vegetables have up to 68% more antioxidants.

Eating organic also reduces your exposure to antibiotics and pesticides as farmers avoid the use of pesticides. If all farming was organic, research suggests that pesticide use would drop by 98%. Over 320 pesticides are routinely used in farming and often present in non-organic food. Farm animals account for almost two-thirds of all antibiotics used in the EU and these are passed down to us through the food chain. In organic farming systems the routine or preventative use of antibiotics is banned.

Organic is expensive

Organic can sometimes be more expensive but not every time.

Staples like pulses, pasta, rice and wholegrains are often the same price and when you can, buying directly from farmers or through box schemes, helps too.

Also, if you plan meals in advance, you can eat less but better-quality meat, or try different, cheaper cuts with seasonal ingredients. When organic does cost more, you’re paying for the extra care organic farmers place on the environment and animal welfare.

Organic is made up

If you want to know exactly what’s in your food – choose organic. All organic food is fully traceable from farm to fork, so you can be sure of what you’re eating. The standards for organic food are laid down in European law so any food labelled as organic must meet strict rules and be independently inspected and certified by a business like the Soil Association. Soil Association Certification is a symbol you can trust.

Organic isn’t easily available 

Organic is everywhere; in over 8,000 shops across the country. Aldi, Lidl and Tesco have increased their organic lines, all milk at both McDonald’s and Pret is organic, and schools, hospitals and universities across the country serve it every day. This year, the Soil Association has certified over 3,000 new organic products.

Organic is old fashioned

Sure, all food was produced organically 100 years ago – but it’s far from old fashioned. Some of the most innovative new products are organic – from nut butters to flavoured cold tea drinks, speciality flours and superfoods

When you buy organic you can be sure what you buy has been produced to the very highest standards. It means fewer pesticides, no artificial additives or preservatives, always free range, higher standards of animal welfare and absolutely no GM.

If you’re interested in finding out about the best in organic, check out the Soil Association Boom Awards.

You may also like...

Share with your friends or save for later...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Email this to someone
email
Share on Reddit
Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin