The health benefits of chamomile tea

Posted on Jul 27 2016 - 2:00pm by Ashlea Curley
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We know that herbal teas hold many benefits for our health and beauty complexion. But when it comes to chamomile, we hold a handful of incredible benefits for our body. In just one cup we can relieve stress, painful periods and even cure the common cold.

Chamomile flowers look exactly like small daisies with a yellow-button centre, surrounded by white leathery petals. It’s easy to plant them from seeds in the spring. They need to be sowed in shade with access to grow into the sun, and with dry soil. They only then need to be watered in times of prolonged drought.

Chamomile tea is most famous for its abilities to ease stomach pain and help us to sleep easily. The oil in chamomile reduces stomach aggravation by relaxing stomach muscles and encourages them to work naturally. Scientists refer to chamomile as a stress reliever and a nerve relaxant. Chamomile also has mild sedative effects which help ease anxiety and depression allowing you to get a good night’s sleep.

You can also fight off colds with chamomile tea as it helps boost your immune system. It gives your immune system a kick to get it working and improve your health.

Chamomile naturally increases levels of amino acid glycine in your body, which reduces muscle spasms. This allows the body and the uterus to relax and ease during menstrual cramps. Chamomile may also help to regulate irregular periods due to its emmenagogue effects. It works by stimulating blood flow in the pelvic area and uterus.

You will need:

  • 3-4 teaspoons chamomile flower heads
  • Enough hot water for one cup
  • Teapot
  • Sieve/strainer
  • Your favourite mug
  • Honey or lemon (optional)

Method:

  1. Put your chamomile flowers into a teapot.

You’ll only need the heads of the flower for tea, try harvesting them the same day you want tea to gain all the benefits.

  1. Pour the water on the flowers and leave to infuse for three minutes.
  2. Put the sieve over your mug and pour the chamomile tea into it to remove the flowers and any excess.
  3. Add honey or lemon to add flavour and enjoy!

Please note: pregnant women should not drink chamomile tea as it has previously been used as a uterine stimulant and increases the risk of miscarriages or harm to your unborn baby.

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