Party Planning: How to host a Spring time event

Posted on Apr 19 2017 - 4:00pm by Samantha Clark
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with etiquette tips for those attending

The warmer days, longer nights, the flowers blooming and greenery showing. It’s no wonder we’re in better spirits when Spring time comes around and we feel particularly more social and want to spend a greater amount of my time outdoors to lavish every single moment. And with the coming of Spring, we see many more functions between friends and family. So whether you’re looking to host or you’ll be a guest attending one of these shindigs, we’ve some suggestions for both.

When it comes to hosting

Themes:

The type of event you want to hold will usually dictate how everything else comes together. Food is a common denominator when it comes to themes. For example, if you want to hold a dinner party, determine what your main dish will be and voila, you have a theme to help inspire; you can have tapas or paella as your main for a spanish theme and make margaritas to accompany with a little spanish music in the background.

With the warmer days comes warmer nights; it’s time to start up the outdoor movies once more. All you need for this is a projector, laptop, speakers and a sheet and you’ve got yourself an outdoor screening! Make s’mores and popcorn and snuggle under a blanket to enjoy the outdoors in a whole new light. It’s also been a pretty popular option amongst friends.

Outdoor movie

For an outdoor movie you need: a sheet and pegs, projector, laptop and speakers.

For some other ideas, take a look at our summer dining/party ideas board on pinterest- we’ll be adding new inspiration to this over the coming weeks so make sure you follow it to stay up to date.

Or if you’re just looking to get your friends together then you don’t even need a dedicated theme; in your invitations let your friends/family know what it is your doing so you’ve set out some expectations. Lay out the day, time, whether it’ll be indoors or out and whether you’ll be providing food and drink or whether you’d like your guests to bring their own (you can!).

The food:

BBQ’s are always a hit, who doesn’t love a BBQ? It also means that you can be out in the garden too enjoying the sun and still feel included in discussions. If you haven’t got the space to have an open flame and lots of people then what about these other options:

Buffets are perhaps the simplest spread – you can mix and match your food choices; ideal for the fussy eaters and the majority can always be prepared well in advance. Plus there are lots of food choices that allow you to take short cuts such as sliced meat platters, sausage rolls and pork pies as well as cheeseboards.  What’s more, you don’t have to worry about the coal/wood burning smells from the BBQ lingering on every surface in your house (assuming doors and windows will be open of course).

Dinner party

The food you serve can also help determine the theme of your event

What about a picnic in the garden? Ok so it’s quite similar to a buffet idea but throw down a  couple of  blankets, arrange for the food to be outside, prop yourselfs up on pillows and enjoy- this also has the potential for an easier clean up as the idea is that you’ll not need to go into the house so much.

Take a look out our In The Home segment for recipe inspiration- our pinterest board of the same name will also give you food for thought.

Etiquette tips on attending any event:

  • Let them know you are coming one way or another- if you commit to attending, ensure you attend unless you’ve good reason- they’ve likely made special accommodations to have you over whether that’s extra food, drink etc. it’ll come at a cost to your host/hostess. If they feel messed around, you’ll unlikely be invited to the next occasion.
  • Always be respectful of your host/hostess and that includes their home and their possessions. Whether you’re a relative or close friend, always treat their home with the utmost respect. We all have different expectations, house rules and behaviours so it’s probably not wise to ‘make yourself at home’. For example, check if it’s ok to wear shoes around the house before entering; appreciate there may be boundaries on where you go, it’s probably not appropriate to go into their bedroom; and don’t just go into cupboards or the fridge without asking your host/hostess.
  • Offer to contribute to the occasion- whether that’s bring a dish, cater for the desserts, offer up some of your decorations suitable to the event or even help with the dishes whilst you’re there. Every little bit helps after all. Even if your guests refuse, we’d still recommend you take them a little something;
  • Thank your hosts- it’s something that seems to have gone awry in recent times but it was always courteous to give a little gift to the host/hostess. After all, time, effort and probably money has gone into having you over. Although of course they did this off their own backs, they really didn’t have to and it’s nice to feel appreciated. It doesn’t have to be anything extravagant; it could be a bottle of something, a  small box of chocolates or even a handwritten note after the fact.

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